Look at this fuckin harpie, mooning you like that…
ainsleyyeager:

fiddlemod:

Arin Hanson

This is gold
ainsleyyeager:

fiddlemod:

Arin Hanson

This is gold
ainsleyyeager:

fiddlemod:

Arin Hanson

This is gold
ainsleyyeager:

fiddlemod:

Arin Hanson

This is gold
ainsleyyeager:

fiddlemod:

Arin Hanson

This is gold
ainsleyyeager:

fiddlemod:

Arin Hanson

This is gold
ainsleyyeager:

fiddlemod:

Arin Hanson

This is gold
Lyra Belacqua
spookbot:

samdraws:


spookbot's Gethin the witch is swapping out for Galen the bard this week! Who DOESN'T want to hear some tunes, man

SCREAMS INTO THE NIGHT OH MY GOD
SAM YOU ARE THE BEST AROUND
spookbot:

samdraws:


spookbot's Gethin the witch is swapping out for Galen the bard this week! Who DOESN'T want to hear some tunes, man

SCREAMS INTO THE NIGHT OH MY GOD
SAM YOU ARE THE BEST AROUND
spookbot:

samdraws:


spookbot's Gethin the witch is swapping out for Galen the bard this week! Who DOESN'T want to hear some tunes, man

SCREAMS INTO THE NIGHT OH MY GOD
SAM YOU ARE THE BEST AROUND
coelasquid:

typette:

maybeiwillpost:

RIME - Gamescom 2014 Trailer

windwaker + shadow of the colossusget hype

Yessss so happy to see more of this game
coelasquid:

typette:

maybeiwillpost:

RIME - Gamescom 2014 Trailer

windwaker + shadow of the colossusget hype

Yessss so happy to see more of this game
coelasquid:

typette:

maybeiwillpost:

RIME - Gamescom 2014 Trailer

windwaker + shadow of the colossusget hype

Yessss so happy to see more of this game
coelasquid:

typette:

maybeiwillpost:

RIME - Gamescom 2014 Trailer

windwaker + shadow of the colossusget hype

Yessss so happy to see more of this game
coelasquid:

typette:

maybeiwillpost:

RIME - Gamescom 2014 Trailer

windwaker + shadow of the colossusget hype

Yessss so happy to see more of this game
coelasquid:

typette:

maybeiwillpost:

RIME - Gamescom 2014 Trailer

windwaker + shadow of the colossusget hype

Yessss so happy to see more of this game
coelasquid:

typette:

maybeiwillpost:

RIME - Gamescom 2014 Trailer

windwaker + shadow of the colossusget hype

Yessss so happy to see more of this game
pierceaholic:

anadalusjack:

spicyshimmy:

THIS IS NOT A DRILL. FEMALE DWARVES CAN HAVE BEARDS.

The slider seems to be at Max and all I see is stubble…

Looks like you’re right. I’d assumed the points on the slider were different styles vs. a min-max range, but I just watched the video where they went through the range of available selections and it looks like the most robust facial hair female dwarves can have is stubble.
mcoats:

aftertouchs:

hawkelahawke:

Firaxis Games’ concept artist Sang Han Sang on how to give your digital art a traditional look and feel. [source]
00. BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Many people have tried using brushes that simulate analogue bristles, but they may not have thought about how the paint is applied. Traditional painters take great care in applying each stroke of paint, which has been thoughtfully blended to the right colour and value on a palette.
Since the digital medium is so fast and forgiving, we tend to dive right in without much thought and noodle around until something happens. I think this leads to muddy colours, and the energy of the initial gesture gets lost.

01. SKETCH IT OUT

I begin with a rough sketch, trying to keep it loose and gestural. It’s difficult to think about design, colour, lighting and composition all in one pass so I break it down into steps and keep it simple at the beginning. These early steps are important because not only are they the foundation for an entire painting, but some of these strokes may show through in the finished work.

02. LAYER IT UP

Here I create a new layer and change the mode to Multiply. I then paint on this layer with a colour that resembles yellow ochre or burnt sienna. This will help to gauge value and colour more easily than if it was a white canvas. I could have simply filled the layer with a flat colour, but again, the painted strokes may show through and add to the final painting.

03. RENDERING

In this step, I block in the local colours and start rendering. As I do this, I try to remember not to overly blend or noodle around too much, as mentioned above. One of my goals is to retain the energy of each brush-stroke and put paint down with a sense of conviction. Sometimes I put a single stroke down, undo it and repeat this process many times until I’m satisfied.

04. LEAVE MARKS

Keep in mind that you don’t have to render everything. You’ll notice in traditional paintings, certain details are kept as abstract marks. This adds another level of interest to the viewer. As you get closer to the end of the painting, lay the strokes down with lower opacity to give the effect of thicker paint. I like to do this when rendering certain accents, such as highlights.


I need this like burning.

mcoats:

aftertouchs:

hawkelahawke:

Firaxis Games’ concept artist Sang Han Sang on how to give your digital art a traditional look and feel. [source]
00. BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Many people have tried using brushes that simulate analogue bristles, but they may not have thought about how the paint is applied. Traditional painters take great care in applying each stroke of paint, which has been thoughtfully blended to the right colour and value on a palette.
Since the digital medium is so fast and forgiving, we tend to dive right in without much thought and noodle around until something happens. I think this leads to muddy colours, and the energy of the initial gesture gets lost.

01. SKETCH IT OUT

I begin with a rough sketch, trying to keep it loose and gestural. It’s difficult to think about design, colour, lighting and composition all in one pass so I break it down into steps and keep it simple at the beginning. These early steps are important because not only are they the foundation for an entire painting, but some of these strokes may show through in the finished work.

02. LAYER IT UP

Here I create a new layer and change the mode to Multiply. I then paint on this layer with a colour that resembles yellow ochre or burnt sienna. This will help to gauge value and colour more easily than if it was a white canvas. I could have simply filled the layer with a flat colour, but again, the painted strokes may show through and add to the final painting.

03. RENDERING

In this step, I block in the local colours and start rendering. As I do this, I try to remember not to overly blend or noodle around too much, as mentioned above. One of my goals is to retain the energy of each brush-stroke and put paint down with a sense of conviction. Sometimes I put a single stroke down, undo it and repeat this process many times until I’m satisfied.

04. LEAVE MARKS

Keep in mind that you don’t have to render everything. You’ll notice in traditional paintings, certain details are kept as abstract marks. This adds another level of interest to the viewer. As you get closer to the end of the painting, lay the strokes down with lower opacity to give the effect of thicker paint. I like to do this when rendering certain accents, such as highlights.


I need this like burning.

mcoats:

aftertouchs:

hawkelahawke:

Firaxis Games’ concept artist Sang Han Sang on how to give your digital art a traditional look and feel. [source]
00. BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Many people have tried using brushes that simulate analogue bristles, but they may not have thought about how the paint is applied. Traditional painters take great care in applying each stroke of paint, which has been thoughtfully blended to the right colour and value on a palette.
Since the digital medium is so fast and forgiving, we tend to dive right in without much thought and noodle around until something happens. I think this leads to muddy colours, and the energy of the initial gesture gets lost.

01. SKETCH IT OUT

I begin with a rough sketch, trying to keep it loose and gestural. It’s difficult to think about design, colour, lighting and composition all in one pass so I break it down into steps and keep it simple at the beginning. These early steps are important because not only are they the foundation for an entire painting, but some of these strokes may show through in the finished work.

02. LAYER IT UP

Here I create a new layer and change the mode to Multiply. I then paint on this layer with a colour that resembles yellow ochre or burnt sienna. This will help to gauge value and colour more easily than if it was a white canvas. I could have simply filled the layer with a flat colour, but again, the painted strokes may show through and add to the final painting.

03. RENDERING

In this step, I block in the local colours and start rendering. As I do this, I try to remember not to overly blend or noodle around too much, as mentioned above. One of my goals is to retain the energy of each brush-stroke and put paint down with a sense of conviction. Sometimes I put a single stroke down, undo it and repeat this process many times until I’m satisfied.

04. LEAVE MARKS

Keep in mind that you don’t have to render everything. You’ll notice in traditional paintings, certain details are kept as abstract marks. This adds another level of interest to the viewer. As you get closer to the end of the painting, lay the strokes down with lower opacity to give the effect of thicker paint. I like to do this when rendering certain accents, such as highlights.


I need this like burning.

mcoats:

aftertouchs:

hawkelahawke:

Firaxis Games’ concept artist Sang Han Sang on how to give your digital art a traditional look and feel. [source]
00. BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Many people have tried using brushes that simulate analogue bristles, but they may not have thought about how the paint is applied. Traditional painters take great care in applying each stroke of paint, which has been thoughtfully blended to the right colour and value on a palette.
Since the digital medium is so fast and forgiving, we tend to dive right in without much thought and noodle around until something happens. I think this leads to muddy colours, and the energy of the initial gesture gets lost.

01. SKETCH IT OUT

I begin with a rough sketch, trying to keep it loose and gestural. It’s difficult to think about design, colour, lighting and composition all in one pass so I break it down into steps and keep it simple at the beginning. These early steps are important because not only are they the foundation for an entire painting, but some of these strokes may show through in the finished work.

02. LAYER IT UP

Here I create a new layer and change the mode to Multiply. I then paint on this layer with a colour that resembles yellow ochre or burnt sienna. This will help to gauge value and colour more easily than if it was a white canvas. I could have simply filled the layer with a flat colour, but again, the painted strokes may show through and add to the final painting.

03. RENDERING

In this step, I block in the local colours and start rendering. As I do this, I try to remember not to overly blend or noodle around too much, as mentioned above. One of my goals is to retain the energy of each brush-stroke and put paint down with a sense of conviction. Sometimes I put a single stroke down, undo it and repeat this process many times until I’m satisfied.

04. LEAVE MARKS

Keep in mind that you don’t have to render everything. You’ll notice in traditional paintings, certain details are kept as abstract marks. This adds another level of interest to the viewer. As you get closer to the end of the painting, lay the strokes down with lower opacity to give the effect of thicker paint. I like to do this when rendering certain accents, such as highlights.


I need this like burning.

mcoats:

aftertouchs:

hawkelahawke:

Firaxis Games’ concept artist Sang Han Sang on how to give your digital art a traditional look and feel. [source]
00. BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Many people have tried using brushes that simulate analogue bristles, but they may not have thought about how the paint is applied. Traditional painters take great care in applying each stroke of paint, which has been thoughtfully blended to the right colour and value on a palette.
Since the digital medium is so fast and forgiving, we tend to dive right in without much thought and noodle around until something happens. I think this leads to muddy colours, and the energy of the initial gesture gets lost.

01. SKETCH IT OUT

I begin with a rough sketch, trying to keep it loose and gestural. It’s difficult to think about design, colour, lighting and composition all in one pass so I break it down into steps and keep it simple at the beginning. These early steps are important because not only are they the foundation for an entire painting, but some of these strokes may show through in the finished work.

02. LAYER IT UP

Here I create a new layer and change the mode to Multiply. I then paint on this layer with a colour that resembles yellow ochre or burnt sienna. This will help to gauge value and colour more easily than if it was a white canvas. I could have simply filled the layer with a flat colour, but again, the painted strokes may show through and add to the final painting.

03. RENDERING

In this step, I block in the local colours and start rendering. As I do this, I try to remember not to overly blend or noodle around too much, as mentioned above. One of my goals is to retain the energy of each brush-stroke and put paint down with a sense of conviction. Sometimes I put a single stroke down, undo it and repeat this process many times until I’m satisfied.

04. LEAVE MARKS

Keep in mind that you don’t have to render everything. You’ll notice in traditional paintings, certain details are kept as abstract marks. This adds another level of interest to the viewer. As you get closer to the end of the painting, lay the strokes down with lower opacity to give the effect of thicker paint. I like to do this when rendering certain accents, such as highlights.


I need this like burning.

tastytribute reblogged your photoset and added:

what kind of pencils are these?

They’re prismacolor col-erase pencil :) Vermillion colour. I love it for preliminary sketches.

ewylouie:

momochanners:

Hay nerds,

If you have Origins but don’t have Dragon Age: Origins, you can now download the RPG for free, until October 15! Follow the link.

ooooooooo

(via ybee)

The first in a series featuring this lady.
tyuran:

For Illustration III, a promo image for a fictional YA fantasy novel (the same image was rejigged for a book cover, banner and web ad). I based the character and setting on an old D&D campaign. Doing the header text was fun!

I updated my theme. Look how pretty I am now (⑅˘͈ ᵕ ˘͈  )

Off my back deckOff my back deck
During DnD I was sketchin some half orc. I like her.During DnD I was sketchin some half orc. I like her.
From my watercolour sketchbook :D The last one’s for a Thing so she might get reposted later with the set. From my watercolour sketchbook :D The last one’s for a Thing so she might get reposted later with the set. From my watercolour sketchbook :D The last one’s for a Thing so she might get reposted later with the set.